List of Terrier Breeds

In general, they make engaging pets, but require owners with the determination to match their dogs’ lively characters. Airedale Terrier. American Hairless Terrier. American Staffordshire Terrier. Australian Terrier. Bedlington Terrier. Border Terrier. Bull Terrier. Cairn Terrier.

List of Terrier Breeds

1 Border Terrier
2 Borzoi Terrier
3 Boston Terrier

1 Border Terrier

Possibly one of Great Britain’s oldest types of terriers, the Border Terrier was first bred in the Cheviot Hills (near the border of Scotland and England). This breed was then used by the farmers to drive away foxes that would kill their stock and to control vermin. Other than foxes, it was also used in tracking and hunting down martens, badgers, rats, otters and mice. With long legs, it can easily keep up with other foxhounds and horses. Though a farm dog, it is nowadays used more as a companion dog. It is basically a multi-talented breed—tracking, hunting, competitive obedience, agility, performing tricks and watchdog. In 1930, the American Kennel Club had recognized this breed.

border-terriers

With a height of 13 to 16 inches (females are an inch or two shorter) and weight of 13 to 16 pounds (females are about 2 pounds lesser), the Border Terrier is medium boned, sturdy and small dog. It has narrow body and shoulders. The medium sized, dark hazel eyes are relatively wide. The short, dark muzzle has a moderate broad stop. It has a black nose. Set on the side of the head, the small, V-shaped, dark colored ears drop forward close to the cheeks. Its front legs are straight. The tail is medium sized that tapers from a thick base. The double coat is dense, wiry and short, and the colors are blue and tan, wheaten, red, or grizzle and tan. The chest may have a little white on it. Professional grooming of the double coat is required twice a year. It is to be bathed only when it is necessary. It needs to be brushed on a weekly basis as it sheds little or no hair. Hence, allergy sufferers can keep it as a pet.

Bold, alert, lively, affectionate, mild-mannered, scruffy, sturdy, and non-aggressive, the Border Terrierhas good stamina and vitality as they were bred to hunt. It should be trained at an early stage to socialize well.  It loves playing with children and is happy with them. Initially active, it will mellow down with age if given plenty of exercise. It should not be trusted with non-canine pets—guinea pigs, rabbits, birds, hamsters—because of its hunting instinct. It should be regularly taken out for mental and physical exercise and long walks. It is quite inactive indoor. It loves to dig; as such, it would be better if additional reinforcements are installed along the bottom of fences. When left alone for long hours or not given regular exercise, it shows separation anxiety and Small Dog syndrome. Where food is concerned, it should be balanced and given little meals twice a day. Do not feed it at one go. Also, you should not overfeed it or allow the children to feed it tidbits whenever they eat something.

With a lifespan of 15 years or more, the Border Terrier in prone to Spike’s Disease (also called “Canine Epileptoid Cramping Syndrome”) that is hereditary. Other than this, it may also face the general health problems associated with small dogs.

2 Borzoi Terrier

A cross between the long-haired Russian sheepdogs and the Arabian Greyhound, the Borzoi (comes from the Russian word “Borzii” meaning “swift”) breed of sighthound was bred by the Russian nobility hundreds of years ago mainly for the purpose of hunting foxes, hares, and wolves.  Its shape is similar to that of greyhound, and its talents lie in sighting, lure coursing, and hunting. With time, it has become docile and is now much suited as a companion dog.

RGFirst

With a height of 28 inches (females are 2 inches shorter) and weight of 75 to 105 pounds (females are about 10 pounds lesser), the head of the Borzoi slightly domed and narrow. It has a slightly arched muzzle, and black, large nose.  The chest is deep but narrow, and the back line is slightly arched upward. The eyes are dark with a slant and the ears are small that lay back on the head. It has straight front legs and the tail is set low with a curve. The hair between the toes spread fast; it needs clipping. The body hair is shorter as compared to the hair on the tail, neck or the hindquarters. The silky, flat (or wavy) and long coat comes in many colors—white, tan, gray or tan with black markings, black, and golden (either mixed or solid colors). It is a seasonal heavy shedder, and as such, needs regular brushing (with firm bristle brush) and dry shampoo when necessary.

Proud, extremely loyal to the family, affectionate (only to people it knows well) intelligent and capable learners, the Borzoi is free-thinking, and as such, not much willing to please humans. It should be given obedience and socialization training at a very early stage. Otherwise also, its training has to be consistent, firm but gentle. It should be trained to follow certain rules and abide by them. The owner needs to display natural authority over it to keep it in line. It rarely barks as it is a quiet dog. Do not keep it off leash too often in an unsafe place as it is prone to chase small animals when it sights them and may not hear you calling it back. You cannot actually curb its hunting instincts. It is good with other dogs but with children and non-canine pets, you have to keep a careful watch.It should never be allowed to spend time with small animals outdoor. It does not like children playing with it, or playing around and making noises. You need to teach them how they should behave with this breed. It should have plenty of mental and physical exercise, and taken out for long walks and runs. It should be fed nutritional diet (mostly in the growing stage) in small amounts twice or thrice a day. Do not give it one large meal a day or try to overfeed as it is prone to bloat. Also, do not exercise it after meals.

With a lifespan of about 10 to 12 years, the Borzoi has health problems similar to other hounds—bloat and overweight issues. Also, it is very sensitive to drugs.

3 Boston Terrier

Also known as the “Boston Bull”, the Boston Terrier was earlier bred for pit-fighting. Its size and style speak differently though! A cross between the English White Terrier (now extinct) and the English Bulldog, it was developed in Boston, USA and was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1893.It is now a terrier by name only—gone are the pit fighting instincts. Today, it is a very popular breed in the US.

boston-terrier

Presently, with a height of 15 to 17 inches and weight of 10 to 25 pounds (originally, it would be of 44 pounds!), the Boston Terrier is a little, stylish and well-muscled dog. The short body is square in appearance. The flat-on-the-top head (also square looking) falls in proportion to the body and the muzzle that is short, wide and deep, falls in proportion to the head. Caesarean births are common because of its large head. The wide-set eyes are round, dark and large, and the nose is black. The cropped or natural small ears are erect. The eyes (to be cleaned daily) and the ears are to be checked for grass seeds and ticks (in the ears). The face needs to be wiped daily with damp cloth. With a broad chest, the legs are quite wide apart. Clipping the nails is necessary. The short tail is screw-shaped or straight. The coat is short and of fine texture. It comes in various colors—black and white, brown and white (some are born with it), seal, and brindle and white. Being an average shedder, it needs to be brushed often with firm bristle brush. It should be bathed when necessary.

An alert, intelligent, playful, affectionate, enthusiastic, gentle and well-mannered dog, the Boston Terrierneeds regular exercise and walks for it to overcome its high strung nature. It is quite sensitive to voices. A learning enthusiast, it is not at all difficult to train this breed. Do not allow it to become willful, dominant, and fight with other dogs for your lack of leadership. It would then lead to Small Dog syndrome and behavioral issues. Do not let it walk all over you or do not give it the upper hand. With leadership qualities, you should display authority and be consistent, confident, firm but gentle with it. It is found that this breed is very friend stranger-friendly, good with elders and excellently reliable if you have children around. Basically, it likes to be a part of the family. It also gets along well with the non-canine pets you would have. Regular mental and physical exercise, long walks and free play are must for this breed. You may find it drooling or snoring. Feed it little meals timely and twice daily. Do not try to overfeed it as it tends to go obese. It needs to stay in shape!

Lifespan of the Boston Terrier is 15 years or more. During its lifetime, it may face quite a number of health problems—entropion, juvenile cataracts, corneal dystrophy, distichiasis, late-onset cataracts, cherry eye, dry eyes, corneal ulcers, luxating patella, deafness, and mast cell, heart and skin tumors. When stressed, it has breathing difficulties especially due to exertion in cold or hot weather.

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