The 3 Best Dog Breeds Of All Time

1 Hungarian Puli Dog

Very popular for its agile and light movement, the compact, hardy and medium sized Puli has square looks and is an all-weather breed. Its history states that it had reached Hungary thousands of years ago with the Magyars, and that its population had dropped drastically during the Second World War. Later, some interested breeders managed to revive the breed.In 1936, it was recognized by the American Kennel Club.

Measuring 16 to 17.5 inches in height (females measure about 14.5 to 16 inches) and 25 to 35 pounds in weight (females measure about 20 to 30 pounds), the fine-boned body of the Puli is quite muscular. The head is domed (egg-shaped on side view, and rounded on front view) and proportionate to the body. The medium sized ears should have black pigment. The eyes are dark brown and almond-shaped. Clean the eyes and ears regularly. Over the back, the tail curls tightly. You need to clip the nails at regular intervals. It unique double coat (undercoat is wooly and soft, and the outer coat is harsh) is corded and literally reaches the ground! The permissible colors should be shades of gray, white (very rare), apricot and black. The apricot coat could be without or with black mask. It is hypoallergenic and does not shed any hair. Daily bathing and coat separation are required though the coat may take some time (about 2 days) to dry.

Cheerful, loyal, lively and adaptive, the Puli is very protective towards the owner and if it finds the owner being threatened, it gives vocal warnings. Excellent obedience and socialization training should be given from puppy stage so that it can be friendly with the family members, children, and other pets—dog(s) and non-canines like guinea pigs, rats, hamsters, rabbits, etc. You need to teach your children proper communication with this breed, and not to tease or hurt it. Never give it a free hand to feel that it is the pack leader. Then it would think you are timid and small dog syndrome would crop up—intimidating, feisty, willful and dominating. Youshould be consistent, firm, stern and authoritative, and at the same time, calm and not harsh. You must avoid stroking, cuddling or overprotecting it. You should set some rules for it and make sure that they are followed. Daily walks, physical and mental exercises, and romping are required. Without this daily routine and also on being left alone for long, it would display behavioral problems like separation anxiety, guarding, obsessive barking and snapping. Sometimes, the problems can lead it to become bity. While out for walks, you need to keep it on leash, and make it heel beside or behind you. If you want to put it off leash, do so in an open but protected area or inside your house. Unleashed in a public area may attract other children to come and play with it, and in the process, they might end up teasing or hurting it. Measured meal should be given twice a day in little proportions. Never give one large meal a day or overfeed it.

With a lifespan of a minimum of 12 years, the otherwise healthy Puli may suffer from eye problems or hip dysplasia. It is not known for Puli to suffer from major health ailments.

2 Rat Terrier Dog Breed Information

Originally developed in 1820 from a cross between the Manchester Terrier and the Smooth Fox Terrier in Great Britain, the muscular Rat Terrier reached in the late 19th century. Once in the US, it was again crossed with the Beagle (for the bulk and abilities like trailing and hunting), the Whippet (for agility and speed), and the Chihuahua and Smooth Fox Terrier (to develop a smaller variety). In rat-baiting pits, it is one of the best breeds. It is an excellent helper for farmers who want to get rid of vermin!

The Rat Terrier comes in different sizes and hence, different heights and weights:

  • Rat Terrier (Standard) – 14 to 23 inches; 12 to 35 pounds
  • Rat Terrier (Mid-size) – 8 to 14 inches; 6 to 8 pounds
  • Rat Terrier (Toy) – 8 inches; 4 to 6 pounds

Here, we would be discussing about Rat Terrier (Standard).

With a meaty and compact body, a chest that is deep, shoulders that are strong, a neck that is solid, the Rat Terrier has legs that are very powerful. The tipped or upright ears turn erect when it becomes quite alert. The tail, short or ling, is either docked or natural. The colors of its coat can be chocolate, white, red, tri-spotted, pearl, black and tan, sable, red brindle, and blue and white. An average shedder, just brush and comb the coat occasionally. Only when absolutely required, dry shampoo it.

Friendly, playful, quick, fearless, intelligent, inquisitive and alert, the Rat Terrier should be raised with your children and other pets if you want it to love and be friendly with them. Even you should teach your children about this breed’s temperament and how to handle it without teasing or hurting it.Excellent obedience and socialization training is required.Never give it a free hand to feel that it is the pack leader. Then it would think you are timid and small dog syndrome would crop up—intimidating, willful and dominating. Youshould be consistent, firm, stern and authoritative, and at the same time, calm and not harsh. You must avoid stroking, cuddling or overprotecting it. You should set some rules for it and make sure that they are followed. Daily walks, and physical and mental exercises are required. Without this daily routine and also on being left alone for long, it would display behavioral problems like separation anxiety, guarding, obsessive barking and snapping. Sometimes, the problems can lead it to become bity. While out for walks, you need to keep it on leash, and make it heel beside or behind you. If you want to put it off leash, do so in an open but properly fenced and protected area—it is a digger and can go out of the fence pretty fast. Unleashed in a public area may attract other children to come and play with it, and in the process, they might end up teasing or hurting it. Measured meal should be given twice a day in little proportions. Never give one large meal a day or overfeed it.

With a lifespan of 15 to 18 years, the Rat Terrier has health problems like progressive retinal atrophy, and hip and elbow dysplasia.

3 Rhodesian Ridgeback Dog

Originating in Zimbabwe, the Rhodesian Ridgeback is a muscular and large hound two of which were introduced in 1877 in Rhodesia by Reverend Helm. This breed was developed from crossing the Ridgebacks (that the Boer settlers imported from South African tribals) with the Deerhound, Great Dane, Khoikhoidog and Mastiff. Those days, it was used as a “nanny” to children and as a hunter-retriever. Extremely well in hunting lions, it was called the “African Lion Hound”! It is a breed that can well adjust to heat and cold and sudden change in temperature. In 1950, it was imported to the US, and in 1955, the American Kennel Club had recognized it.It can be a good watchdog. This breed is not for those owners who do not have time, energy, and patience.

With a height of 25 to 27 inches (females are about an inch smaller) and weight of 80 to 90 pounds (females are about 15 pounds lesser), the flat-between-the-ears head of the Rhodesian Ridgeback is broad, with deep and long muzzle that has a stop that is quite defined. The nose color depends on the coat color—it can be liver, brown or black. Also, the color of the eyes depends on the coat color but usually the eyes are seen to be brown. Its tongue is black and the high-set ears that drop down, tapers to a point from a base that is wide. The strong front legs are straight. With a slight upward curve, the tail tapers to a point from a thick base. The dense and short coat has a symmetrical ridge of hair that is clearly defined and grows down the back middle in opposite direction. The colors of the coat are light wheaten and shades of red. In some dogs, you can see white on the toes and chest. An average shedder, just brush and comb the coat occasionally. Only when absolutely required, dry shampoo it.

Ferocious while hunting, over-protective of their owners but otherwise obedient, gentle, very loyal, intelligent, vigilant, brave and skillful, the Rhodesian Ridgeback can be a good family pet if proper obedience and socialization training is given from the very early stage. If you have small children, it would be better to raise it with them. Otherwise, it may not be good to be around them because there is a chance it might knock them down while playing. Little reserved when strangers/unknown people around, you have to properly introduce it to them so that it can feel at ease. It must be taught to enter or exit any doorway after you enter or exit. Certain dos and don’ts should be set for the dog to follow. Everyone in your family must be taught (if not already experienced) how to handle this breed. If it feels you are timid and submissive, it would tend to be very possessive, overprotective, dominating and aggressive. Physical and mental exercises are required on a daily basis; so are walks or runs or jog. You need to keep it on leash, and make it heel behind or beside you (never ahead of you). Also, it may trail off after an interesting scent if you are not careful when you are holding it by leash. This happens because of its hunting instinct. Without the daily exercise/walk routine, it would be nervous, high strung and restless. You can put it off leash in a safe and protected area, and inside your house. Do not leave it alone for long; then it would show behavioral problems like snapping, separation anxiety, obsessive barking and guarding. Therefore, you need to be consistent, firm, stern and authoritative but not behave harshly at any point of time. Where food is concerned, give it dog food as small meals thrice a day. Other than the meals, do not try to overfeed it. Also, do not give it one large meal a day.

With a lifespan of 10 to 12 years, the hardy Rhodesian Ridgeback is prone to mast cell tumors, cysts, dermoid sinus and hip dysplasia.

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